Spanish Idioms, #14: Quién no Arriesga, No Gana

Quién no arriesga, no gana.

Literally, this translates to “who doesn’t risk, doesn’t gain.” This is pretty self explanatory, but it is more commonly said as “No pain, no gain” in English. When I was looking up other possibilities, I also came across the phrase “Nothing ventured, nothing gained” which might be an older expression for the same idea (or perhaps it is more common to say in other parts of the world). Of course, all of these phrases mean pretty much the same thing – that you have to go out of your comfort zone sometimes to get to the next best thing.

I can really relate to this right now because I’m in the process of making some very difficult decisions about my life next year. As a current English teacher in Barcelona, I have the option of returning to California and working or going to school, continuing with my current school another year, trying another school in a different part of Spain, or trying a different school in another part of the world (South America? Asia? The possibilities are endless!). It is proving really difficult for me to decide. Part of me thinks it would be great to stay here another year, and another part of me keeps whispering “quien no arriesga, no gana…”

Some examples:

“No sé si vale la pena, ¿qué pasa si no funciona?”

“Deberías probar, porque quien no arriesga, no gana.

“I don’t know if it is worth it, what happens if it doesn’t work?”

You should try, because nothing ventured, nothing gained.”

(Durante ejercicio) “No puedo seguir! Duele demasiado, estoy agotado.

“Quien no arriesga, no gana! Vamos!”

(While exercising) “I can’t continue! It hurts too much, I’m exhausted!”

“No pain, no gain! Let’s go!”

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Spanish Idioms, #13: Por Si Las Moscas

Por si las moscas.

Literally, this translates to “for if the flies.” This phrase came about at the dinner table, and my host family had a really difficult time trying to explain the meaning of it to me. I had to look it up to gain real clarity – it is the equivalent of the English expression “just in case,” which I personally use quite a lot. And it’s funny, because when they told me that phrase, I could have sworn I had never heard it before. But now that I know of it, I swear I hear it everywhere!

Some examples:

“Llevamos nuestros paraguas por si las moscas

“Let’s bring out umbrellas just in case.”

“Es importante preparar para un terremoto cuando vives en California, por si las moscas.

“It is important to prepare for an earthquake when you live in California, just in case.”